Monday, November 14, 2011

The Rot Within...

from V-Dare blog,



historians will look back on the early part of November 2011 and say that State College, Pennsylvania provided a perfect case study of the narcotic that fogged so many Americans’ minds, distracting them from the increasingly urgent implications of the National Question.

Longtime head football coach of Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) Joe Paterno was fired last week for his failure to handle charges of rape and sexual abuse of young men brought against former Penn State defense coordinator Jerry Sandusky back in 2002. Indeed, many within the athletic department and school administration have lost their jobs over this blatant cover-up, and Paterno’s 46-year coaching legacy is now irrevocably besmirched.

Read the gruesome Grand Jury report that details just exactly what Paterno and the Penn State higher-ups tried to conceal.


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But November 9, 2011, the date of Paterno’s firing, is also notable as the date when we learned exactly why college football is accurately described as the Opiate of America. Thousands of Penn State students, almost all white, took the streets to riot as the news became public.

They didn’t riot over the fact that Philadelphia is now home to some of the most violent Flash Mobs in the country. They didn’t riot over the hundreds of thousands of dollars in student loan debt they will rack up in earning a degree that will get them a job serving tables. No—they rioted over the firing of a coach who concealed the raping of boys by a pederast whom the North American Man Boy Love Association (NAMBLA) probably considers a hero.

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There’s more. Lost in the present furor is the fact that, over the last 10 years, Penn State has come to rely on disreputable recruits to keep alive the football glory of the past. Sports Illustrated recently found that Penn State ranked fourth in the 2010 Top 25 for players with the highest arrest rates.

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here’s something that, needless to say, went unmentioned in the ESPN story: a rundown of the players who were arrested at Penn State from 2002- 2007. The vast majority of players in trouble with the law were black players. But Penn State’s student body is 75 percent white and 5 percent black. In other words, Penn State’s football program was actively recruiting athletes who brought crime to the school.

One such prized black recruit, LaVon Chisley, was kicked off the team after severe disciplinary problems and was promptly convicted of murder after gruesomely stabbing his victim 93 times. [Ex-Penn St. football player gets life in prison for murder, September 29, 2007] But, hey, he ran a fast 40-yard-dash!

more at the link above


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