Friday, December 28, 2012

Ideological Colonialism...




Radical Liberalism has haunted the land of the living for a long, long time. But in the 20th Century it finally came into its own, conquering continents and enshrining its precepts into a new creed-like religion.

How did it do this?

Either consciously or not, the demigods of the extremist left simply adopted the tactic of the colonialism of the 17th and 18th centuries. 

In North America and Western Europe extremist leftism was presented as the one, true faith and culture to which all men must bow before.

In North America the model for this ideological imperialism was New England Puritanism.

This might seem strange to some, but it is a point of fact that the Puritans were the quintessential left-wing zealots of their day.

How so?

Simple,

At its core, liberalism is the belief that an ideal existence for man cannot only be achieved, but can be achieved through social engineering.

For the Puritans this was expressed as the “Shinning City on a Hill”. They believed that with the right religion, the right legislation, the right social codes and the right leadership, mankind could build a better, more prosperous, society.

Them and their descendants (genetic and ideological) pursued this ideal with ruthless aplomb. First among their neighbors in the north and then later towards their neighbors in the south. Today this Shinning City mandate is the ideological justification for America’s military conquest of planet earth.

It is beyond irony that many on the right fear the United Nations or radical Islamic expansionism when both are equally subservient to, and dependent upon, the American Empire.

Like their pre-20th century predecessors, the radical left of today believes that the “right” ideas, legislation and leadership can and will build a better, more prosperous, tomorrow. And that, to that end, all the world must needs be brought under one, and only one, faith, government and culture.

Thus, they have set out to colonize the whole world with their ideology.

The traditional opposition to this (from ancient times right up to today) is the belief that there never has been and, most importantly, never will be, an ideal form of society; let alone one that can and must envelope the entire planet.

Conservatism, once upon a time, generally meant being cautious and contemplative and reflective. It meant humbly admitting to your self the powerlessness all men have in the face of this wild and uncontrollable wilderness of a world.

Even the mightiest and wisest of kings and sages never believed or sought after an ideal world because they knew it was folly, for “the road to hell is paved with good intentions”.

It is arrogant and hubristic and, ultimately, ignorant to seek after a “better world”.

The world is as it is.
And mankind is as it is.

 Neither has changed in thousands of years and neither will change till one or the other has, at long last, come to its natural end.


In his poem “If”, Rudyard Kipling, seen by many as the poet laureate for imperialism, referred to both Triumph and Disaster as impostors.

What he meant was that the world was running its course long before we came along and will still be running that same course long after we are gone. Our personal (and collective) joys and sorrows are short lived and fade away like a vapor on a breezy summer night.

To believe that we can “build a better tomorrow” is quite literally insane, and from a cosmic point of view, rather humorous.

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