Tuesday, May 30, 2017

No One-God Without The City...



Following on the  previous Polis (City) vs. Arcadia (Country) paradigm from previous posts,



Monotheism, the ideology of there being one god to rule all, is the epitome (and inevitable outgrowth) of The Polis’s perception of itself and the attempt at justification for its moral directive to war on Arcadia.

If the City must needs articulate itself and conceptualize itself as a singularly planned and constructed universal, then ultimately it will construct a cosmology to mirror its self perception.

If The Polis is built with intent and design by sentient, intelligent beings then so too must the universe have a designer; an architect, no less.

If The Polis is organized and planned, so too must be the world.

Centralization begets centralization.

And so we see why they utilize such terms as Pagan (rural) and Heathen (uncultivated) to describe all that is threatening about Arcadia, in its unorganized, un-planed manner.

A heath is a piece of land unmarred by those “dark satanic mills”, and a heathen is a man who knows not the one god.


II



Monotheism, be it Christianity, Judaism, Islam or, to a lesser extent, Zoroastrianism, is a socio-political ideology. It is the Polis’s ultimate attempt at self actualization. It functions on a planned, engineered, conceptualized and constructed program.

As such, The Polis is a Pyramid. Everything must reach a singular point. All roads MUST lead to Rome, so to speak.


If there isn’t one god, one morality, one universal paradigm to which/whom all must submit, then The Polis falls apart. It’s very nature would be seen as inconsistent and untrue.


If society can form organically and function without and beyond planned organization, then the city's presupposition of its own inherent nature becomes entangled in self-doubt.




For the Arcadian there must be,at the least, two gods: Chaos and Order. Ever locked in combat, with neither one fated to prevail over the other.

In the general, though, there are many gods in Arcadia: light, darkness, wind, rain, heat, cold, harvests, malice, fertility,etc.

And yet it might be argued that there are no gods for the Arcadian. For the world is random, fickle, absurd, horrific and redundant (circular).


Frustratingly for The Polis in its critique of Arcadia, both seemingly contradictory possibilities are strangely complimentary in the eyes of the Arcadian.





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